Neutering
NEUTERING SERVICE AT THE LAURELS Want to know more about the cost of neutering a cat or spaying a dog?  Then please read on... PRICE Our prices are very competitive and represent excellent value for money.  However, we do not aim to be the cheapest, because we believe that this would compromise our high standards.  PAIN RELIEF All of our neutering patients have full pain relief, and, with the exception of tom cat castrations, will go home with several days of pain relief.  ANAESTHETIC QUALITY Our anaesthetics are very carefully monitored by trained staff until they are fully awake.  We have excellent equipment to monitor blood pressure and oxygen saturation and keep detailed anaesthetic charts for every anaesthetic.  The anaethetic protocol used is the highly regarded Propofol- Isoflurane combination. 
Great Value for Money We offer great value for money on neutering cats and dogs, without compromising quality.  Our anaesthetic protocols are an excellent standard, with an emphasis on excellent pain control.
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CAT FAQs When is the best time to neuter a cat? The best time to spay a cat is at 6 months old.  Most  people usually find this age suitable, because the cats can  then be let outside once they have fully recovered from  their surgery.  If unneutered males or females are let outside, it is likely  that unwanted pregnancies will occur, increasing the  number of stray cats.  Letting an unneutered tom cat out will also expose him to  increased risk of infectious diseases such as FIV, which is  commonly spread amongst sexually intact male cats by  fighting.  How much does it cost to neuter a cat? The price of neutering a cat varies depending on whether  you require a castration or spay.  Please call us for an up-  to-date price.  What does it mean when you “spay a cat”? Spaying a cat means a surgical operation to remove the  ovaries and uterus (womb).  An incision is made on the  flank to access the abdominal cavity.  Once the ovaries and womb have been removed, then the muscle and skin layers  are closed.  We use absorbable, internal stitches that are  not visible, and do not need to be removed. Some people prefer the skin incision to be made in the  underside.  This means that the fur is clipped from the  underside rather than the flank, which means that if the fur grows back slightly differently, it will not adversely affect a  cat that is being shown at cat shows. 
DOG FAQs When is the best time to neuter a dog? It is best to spay a dog 2-3 months after her first  season, however, in many dogs it is reasonable to spay  them at 6 months old.  Please phone one of our vets to  discuss the health and behavioural issues involved. A male dog is best castrated after it has fully developed,  with most of our castrations performed between 6-18  months old.  Please call us to discuss this with a vet.    How much does it cost to neuter a dog? The price varies depending on body weight and  procedure.  Because prices vary from time to time,  please call us for an estimate.   What does it mean when you “spay a dog”? Spaying a dog means a surgical operation to remove the  ovaries and uterus (womb).  An incision is made on the  underside to access the abdominal cavity.  Once the  ovaries and womb have been removed, then the muscle  and skin layers are closed.  We use absorbable, internal  stitches that are not visible, and do not need to be  removed.    It is unsafe to leave the ovaries, and only remove the  uterus (womb).  This is because the ovaries will still  cause the dog to come into season every 6 months, and  will so she will still be attracting attention from male  dogs.  Furthermore, health problems such as breast  cancer, stump pyometra (infection) and vaginal tumours  can still develop. The risk of these diseases is very much  reduced when the ovaries are also removed. 
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Great Value Neutering With The Highest Standards
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Laurels Veterinary Centre